St Mary’s Abbey, Dublin, Ireland – Things to See and Do

  • Author:ActiveME
  • Created: January 20, 2014
  • Updated: December 12, 2017
Location: Dublin
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St Mary's Abbey, Dublin, Ireland was a former Cistercian Abbey. Its territory stretched from the district known as Oxmanstown down along the River Liffey until it met the sea. It also owned large estates in other parts of Ireland. It was one of several liberties that existed in Dublin since the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in the 12th century, which gave it jurisdiction over its lands. The abbey was founded by the Irish king Maol Sheachlainn (died 862) in 846, according to the Annals of the Four Masters. It was originally Benedictine, but in 1139 was given by Malachy O'Morga, the legate of the Pope, to monks belonging to the Congregation of Savigny, which in 1147 joined the Cistercian Order. The Abbey is one of Dublin's best kept secrets. It was once the wealthiest Cistercian Abbey in Ireland. Today only two rooms remain - the Chapter House and the Slype. The Abbey played a large role in the affairs of the state until its dissolution by Henry VIII in 1539. It was in the Chapter House that "Silken" Thomas Fitzgerald started his unsuccessful rebellion in 1534 and it is in this context that the Abbey is mentioned in the "Wandering Rocks" chapter of Ulysses by James Joyce.

1. St Mary's Abbey, Dublin, Ireland - Things to See and Do

Altitude: 5 m

St Mary’s Abbey, Dublin, Ireland was a former Cistercian Abbey. Its territory stretched from the district known as Oxmanstown down along the River Liffey until it met the sea. It also owned large estates in other parts of Ireland. It was one of several liberties that existed in Dublin since the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in the 12th century, which gave it jurisdiction over its lands. The abbey was founded by the Irish king Maol Sheachlainn (died 862) in 846, according to the Annals of the Four Masters. It was originally Benedictine, but in 1139 was given by Malachy O’Morga, the legate of the Pope, to monks belonging to the Congregation of Savigny, which in 1147 joined the Cistercian Order. The Abbey is one of Dublin’s best kept secrets. It was once the wealthiest Cistercian Abbey in Ireland. Today only two rooms remain – the Chapter House and the Slype. The Abbey played a large role in the affairs of the state until its dissolution by Henry VIII in 1539. It was in the Chapter House that “Silken” Thomas Fitzgerald started his unsuccessful rebellion in 1534 and it is in this context that the Abbey is mentioned in the “Wandering Rocks” chapter of Ulysses by James Joyce.